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Posted: Feb 20, 6:09p ET | Updated: Feb 20, 10:08p ET

Putting women's bobsledding on the map

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Women's bobsledding is one of the most brutal and tough events at the winter Olympic games. For that reason, the Olympic committee didn't make it an official event until 2002. Getting to that point was a battle for two north Texas women.

In 1996, sisters Alex Allred and Michelle Powe decided to take on, what they were told, was the impossible. They started the first u-s women's national bobsled team.

"When it started, there were, we had no sleds, no uniforms no equipment, no coaches no sponsorship," said Allred.

Allred had been told that a bobsled was too fast, too heavy, too dangerous for women. She wanted to prove everyone wrong. A two-man bobsled team consists of a pusher and a driver. Their first decision, who would do what?

"We had to stand there and flip a coin, and the two of us who won the coin toss became the drivers," said Powe.

For these ladies, every moment of being on the team was an adventure. Allred recalled a crash during one international event.

"The first face that I saw was Dudley Stokes of the Jamaican bobsled team and just like the movie he said 'Hey man, you ok man?' and I said, 'no man, I’m not ok,’" she said.

Alex Allred and Michelle Powe were a couple of the women who worked to make women's bobsledding an Olympic sport.

These sisters say the sport was a game of trial and error.

"Those sort of ridiculous things happened all the time because they didn't think to say it to us and we didn't have a coach there with us," Powe said.

They say their sleds are a far cry from what the women in Vancouver are riding.

"They have it made, they have everything,” they said.

Both women retired before women's bobsledding became an Olympic sport in 2002, but they say being able to get the sport started is an unbelievable feeling.

"It's our baby, we're proud, really proud. We're proud parents,” they said. 

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